Updated On: June 19, 2020

Legos

Art & Design

Architecture

Children & Teenagers
Create: Build a model version of your home.

Engineering & Technology

Children
Create / Discuss: Create ships and trains and carriages and other modes of transportation to discuss how technology and travel have changed throughout time.

Children
Read: The Lego Ideas Book is a good way to get a legos enthusiast reading a book much like those referenced by engineers. “Discover new and creative building ideas, tips, and tricks for your LEGO® bricks with this #1 New York Times bestseller.”

Children & Teenagers
Watch: Watch this video about how Legos are made (it’s over 5 minutes long). It might be better understood after learning about how plastic is made (see Chemistry section).

Language & Thinking

Writing Fiction

Children
Write: Create a script for family members to act out a play using Lego characters.

Children
Write a Short Story: After assembling a castle or house, write a short story using it as the setting.

Writing Nonfiction

Children
Write a How-To Guide: Write custom instructions to help a sibling or friend learn how to assemble something unique.

Children
Write a Letter: Write a letter to the manufacturers of Lego suggesting a new design or theme.

Math

Advanced Math

Children & Teenagers
Teach Passively: Explore differential calculus by plotting Lego curves on a coordinate graph created with blocks.

Fractions, Decimals, & Percentages

Children
Teach Passively: Introduce fractions by using the different sizes of Legos to represent parts of a whole.

Geometry & Trigonometry

Children & Teenagers
Teach Passively: Teach geometry using the shapes and sizes of Legos.

Miscellaneous & Multidisciplinary

Children & Teenagers
Create: Create a Rube Goldberg machine using Legos.

Science

Biology & Human Body

Children
Discuss: Use Lego animals and plants to discuss biology.

Chemistry

Children
Create: Create a periodic table using Legos to teach chemistry.

Children & Teenagers
Watch: Learn how plastic and polymer are made (the difference between the two is explained here). Here is a 6-minute National Geographic video about it and a 10-minute Crash Course video about it.

Geology

Children
Create: Create mountains and hills using blocks to learn about topology, elevation, soil erosion, etc.

Physics

Children & Teenagers
Teach Passively: Learn about weight, lift, thrust, and drag using Lego airplanes.

Social Sciences

History

Children
Act Out: Use Lego people to represent different countries interacting with, or fighting against, one another throughout history.

Children & Teenagers
Create: Build historical buildings and learn about the people who created and used them.

How else might important subject matter be learned from this interest topic? Comment below! Half-baked ideas are more than welcome, too.