Babies and Toddlers Book List

**Amelia BedeliaPeggy Parish (*Audible)

~4, United States, 1963

“From dressing the chicken to drawing the drapes, Amelia Bedelia does exactly what Mr. and Mrs. Rogers tell her to do. If things get a bit mixed up, well, that’s okay. When Amelia Bedelia is involved, everything always turns out perfectly in the end!” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

The Berenstain BearsJan and Stan Berenstain

3+, United States, 1974

“The Berenstain Bears… are all about new experiences children encounter in their early years. With good-natured wisdom, love, and gentle humor, these books ease the way for kids – and their parents – through these first times.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, Bill Martin, Jr (and Eric Carle) (**Audible)

~3, United States, 1967

“A big happy frog, a plump purple cat, a handsome blue horse, and a soft yellow duck–all parade across the pages of this delightful book. Children will immediately respond to Eric Carle’s flat, boldly colored collages. Combined with Bill Martin’s singsong text, they create unforgettable images of these endearing animals.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*The Cat in the HatDr. Seuss (**Audible)

~4, United States, 1957

“Poor Dick and Sally. It’s cold and wet and they’re stuck in the house with nothing to do . . . until a giant cat in a hat shows up, transforming the dull day into a madcap adventure and almost wrecking the place in the process! ” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books, Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

**Chicka Chicka Boom BoomBill Martin Jr. and John Archambault (Audible)

1+, United States, 1989

“A told B and B told C, ‘I’ll meet you at the top of the coconut tree.’” When all the letters of the alphabet race one another up the coconut tree, will there be enough room?” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**CorduroyDon Freeman (*Audible)

1+, United States, 1968

“Poor Corduroy! Why won’t anyone buy him? Could it be because his overalls are missing a button? Late at night the teddy bear searches the store for his button. He never finds it, but he does find…” – Common Sense Media

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Curious GeorgeH.A. Rey (Audible)

~4, United States, 1939

“The first adventure in this highly popular series tells how the little monkey Curious George, caught in the jungle and brought back to the city by a man in a yellow hat, can’t help being interested in all the new things around him. Though well meaning, George’s curiosity always gets him into trouble. Young readers can easily relate, and Rey’s cheerful illustrations celebrate Curious George’s innocence.” – GoodReads
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**Dear ZooRod Campbell

1+, Scotland, 1982

“Young readers love lifting the flaps to discover the animals the zoo has sent-a monkey, a lion, and even an elephant! But will they ever find the perfect pet?” – Amazon
More information: GoodReads

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!Mo Willems (*Audible)

2+, United States, 2003

“When a bus driver takes a break from his route, a very unlikely volunteer springs up to take his place-a pigeon! But you’ve never met one like this before. As he pleads, wheedles, and begs his way through the book, children will love being able to answer back and decide his fate.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

*The Frog and Toad CollectionArnold Lobel  (*Audible)

~4, United States, 1970

“Frog and Toad are always there for each other—just as best friends should be! From sledding in winter to eating ice cream on hot summer days, these two friends have fun together the whole year round! ” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media: 1234Wikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

*The Giving TreeShel Silverstein

2+, United States, 1964

“Since it was first published fifty years ago, Shel Silverstein’s poignant picture book for readers of all ages has offered a touching interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another’s capacity to love in return.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in TJEd.org’s Classics, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**Go, Dog. Go!P. D. Eastman

~3, United States, 1961

“Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question ‘Do you like my hat?’” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**Goodnight MoonMargaret Wise Brown (**Audible)

~2, United States, 1947

“In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. “Goodnight room, goodnight moon.” And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room—to the picture of the three little bears sitting on chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one—the little bunny says goodnight. In this classic of children’s literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books, New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

*Grandfather’s JourneyAllen Say (*Audible)

~4, United States, 1993

“Lyrical, breathtaking, splendid—words used to describe Allen Say’s Grandfather’s Journey when it was first published. At once deeply personal yet expressing universally held emotions, this tale of one man’s love for two countries and his constant desire to be in both places captured readers’ attention and hearts.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Green Eggs and HamDr. Seuss (**Audible)

~3, United States, 1960

“Dr. Seuss created this book by transposing ham and eggs, coloring them green, and using the word ‘not’ eighty-two times. The unquenchable Sam-I-am drags poor Mr. Negativity over hill, dale, and precarious aerial train track (with a cheerful mouse, fox, and goat in tow) until the hapless green-eggs-and-ham-hater consents to try the despised green breakfast.” – Wikipedia
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Harold and the Purple CrayonCrockett Johnson (**Audible)

~2, United States, 1955

“One evening Harold decides to go for a walk in the moonlight. Armed only with an oversize purple crayon, young Harold draws himself a landscape full of wonder and excitement. Harold and his trusty crayon travel through woods and across seas and past dragons before returning to bed, safe and sound. Full of funny twists and surprises, this charming story shows just how far your imagination can take you.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

*I Want My Hat BackJon Klassen (*Audible)

2+, Canada, 2011

“The bear’s hat is gone, and he wants it back. Patiently and politely, he asks the animals he comes across, one by one, whether they have seen it. Each animal says no, some more elaborately than others. But just as the bear begins to despond, a deer comes by and asks a simple question that sparks the bear’s memory and renews his search with a vengeance. Told completely in dialogue, this delicious take on the classic repetitive tale plays out in sly illustrations laced with visual humor—and winks at the reader with a wry irreverence that will have kids of all ages thrilled to be in on the joke.” – GoodReads
More information: Common Sense MediaGoodReads

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

If You Give a Moose a MuffinLaura Numeroff 

~4, United States, 1991

“If a big hungry moose comes to visit, you might give him a muffin to make him feel at home. If you give him a muffin, he’ll want some jam to go with it. When he’s eaten all your muffins, he’ll want to go to the store to get some more muffin mix.” – Amazon

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

If You Give a Mouse a CookieLaura Numeroff

~4, United States, 1985

“If a hungry little mouse shows up on your doorstep, you might want to give him a cookie. And if you give him a cookie, he’ll ask for a glass of milk. He’ll want to look in a mirror to make sure he doesn’t have a milk mustache, and then he’ll ask for a pair of scissors to give himself a trim…” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Knuffle BunnyMo Willems (*Audible)

~4, United States, 2004

“Merging expressive cartoon network-esque illustrations with beautiful black and white photographs of Brooklyn, this funny story tells how Trixie and Knuffel Bunny’s trip to the laundromat with Dad goes terribly wrong when Trixie realizes some bunny’s been left behind…! Her attempts to alert Dad all the way home are unsuccessful, until Mum points out that Knuffel Bunny is missing and the family hotfoot it back to the laundromat. Fortunately, KB is safe, if a little wet…” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Lilly’s Purple Plastic PurseKevin Henke

~4, United States, 1996

“Lilly loves everything about school, especially her cool teacher, Mr. Slinger. But when Lilly brings her purple plastic purse and its treasures to school and can’t wait until sharing time, Mr. Slinger confiscates her prized possessions. Lilly’s fury leads to revenge and then to remorse and she sets out to make amends. Lilly, the star of Chester’s Way and Julius, the Baby of the World, is back. And this time she has her name in the title – something she’s wanted all along. If you thought Lilly was funny before, you are in for a treat. So hurry up and start reading. Lilly can’t wait for you to find out more about her.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaGoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*The Little Engine That CouldWatty Piper (*Audible)

~3, Hungary, 1930

“The story of a train filled with toys and gifts for little boys and girls that breaks down before reaching the children. After asking several passing trains for help over the hill, a little blue train agrees to help the stranded toys. Even though she is small, the blue train tries her best to bring the toys to the children on the other side of the hill.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in TJEd.org’s Classics, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Lost and FoundOliver Jeffers

~3, United Kingdom, 2005

“There once was a boy… and one day a penguin arrives on his doorstep. The boy decides the penguin must be lost and tries to return him. But no one seems to be missing a penguin. So the boy decides to take the penguin home himself, and they set out in his row boat on a journey to the South Pole. But when they get there, the boy discovers that maybe home wasn’t what the penguin was looking for after all…” – Amazon
More information: Wikipedia

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Love You ForeverRobert Munsch

~4, Canada, 1986

“A young woman holds her newborn son
And looks at him lovingly. Softly she sings to him: ‘I’ll love you forever, I’ll like you for always, As long as I’m living, My baby you’ll be.’ So begins the story that has touched the hearts of millions worldwide.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*MadelineLudwig Bemelmans

~3, United States, 1939

“Nothing frightens Madeline—not tigers, not even mice. With its endearing, courageous heroine, cheerful humor, and wonderful, whimsical drawings of Paris, the Madeline stories are true classics that continue to charm readers” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

*Make Way for DucklingsRobert McCloskey (*Audible)

~3, United States, 1941

“Mrs. Mallard was sure that the pond in the Boston Public Gardens would be a perfect place for her and her eight ducklings to live.  The problem was how to get them there through the busy streets of Boston.  But with a little help from the Boston police, Mrs. Mallard and Jack, Kack, Lack, Nack, Ouack, Pack, and Quack arive safely at their new home.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Millions of CatsWanda Gág (*Audible)

2+, United States, 1928

“Once upon a time there was an old man and an old woman who were very lonely. They decided to get a cat, but when the old man went out searching, he found not one cat, but millions and billions and trillions of cats! Unable to decide which one would be the best pet, he brought them all home. How the old couple came to have just one cat to call their own is a classic tale that has been loved for generations.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Miss Nelson is Missing!Harry Allard (**Audible)

~4, United States, 1977

“So begins this quirky classic, first published in 1977 and still relevant today as a lighthearted reminder to show our appreciation to those we value. The students don’t proffer a shred of respect for their good-natured teacher Miss Nelson, but when the witchy substitute Miss Viola Swamp appears on the scene, they start to regret their own wicked ways. James Marshall’s scritchy, cartoonish full-color ink and wash illustrations are hilarious. A back-to-school perennial!” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*OliviaIan Falconer (**Audible)

2+, United States, 2000

“Have fun with Olivia… dressing up, singing songs, building sand castles, napping (maybe), dancing, painting on walls and – whew! – going to sleep at last.” – GoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

Pete the Cat: I Love My White ShoesKimberly Dean, James Dean, Eric Litwin

~4, United States, 2008

“Pete the Cat goes walking down the street wearing his brand-new white shoes. Along the way, his shoes change from white to red to blue to brown to WET as he steps in piles of strawberries, blueberries, and other big messes! But no matter what color his shoes are, Pete keeps movin’ and groovin’ and singing his song…because it’s all good. Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes asks the reader questions about the colors of different foods and objects—kids love to interact with the story.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**The Poky Little PuppyJanette Sabring Lowrey

~3, United States, 1942

“The story of a curious puppy, who digs holes under fences and who has to go to bed without any strawberry shortcake, has delighted families for generations. It is, quite simply, an icon.” – Amazon
More information: Wikipedia

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Press HereHerve Tullet (Audible)

~3, France, 2010

“Press the yellow dot on the cover of this interactive children’s book, follow the instructions within, and embark upon a magical journey! Each page of this surprising touch book instructs the reader to push the button, shake it up, tilt the book, and who knows what will happen next! Children and adults alike will giggle with delight as the dots multiply, change direction, and grow in size! Especially remarkable because the adventure occurs on the flat surface of the simple, printed page, this unique interactive picture book about the power of imagination and interactivity will provide read-aloud fun for all ages!” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaGoodReads

Appearing in Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

The Real Mother GooseTomie dePaola (*Audible)

~4, 16th Century France (Originally)

“Tomie dePaola’s collection of traditional rhymes is a visual treat for both children and parents. His cheerful, humorous style enlivens 200 rhymes that star both the familiar Mother Goose cast of characters and those not as well known. Some pages are devoted to one rhyme–including all the verses–while other pages feature a variety of shorter rhymes or thematic groupings (such as verses about weather). Amidst the nursery rhymes are American poems such as “Yankee Doodle” and “Hush Little Baby,” along with traditional poems such as “Three Little Kittens.” This collection is a delightful introduction to poetry as well as an entertaining, comprehensive Mother Goose book. ” – Amazon
More information: GoodReads

Appearing in TJEd.org’s Classics and New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books

(Here are 18th century manuscripts of Mother Goose tales, which are closer to the original versions.)

*The Red BalloonAlbert Lamorisse

~3, France, 1956

The Red Balloon is the moving story of a boy and his best friend—a bright red balloon. Told through captivating photographs taken during filming, and set against the unmistakable beauty of the streets of Paris, Albert Lamorisse’s beloved story is a moving tribute to childhood that continues to inspire readers of every generation.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**The Runaway BunnyMargaret Wise Brown (Audible)

~3, United States, 1942

“A little bunny keeps running away from his mother in this imaginary game of hide-and-seek. Children will be profoundly comforted by this lovingly steadfast mother who finds her child every time.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*A Sick Day for Amos McGeePhilip C. Stead (**Audible)

~3, United States, 2010

“Friends come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. In Amos McGee’s case, all sorts of species, too! Every day he spends a little bit of time with each of his friends at the zoo, running races with the tortoise, keeping the shy penguin company, and even reading bedtime stories to the owl. But when Amos is too sick to make it to the zoo, his animal friends decide it’s time they returned the favor.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**The SnowmanRaymond Briggs

~4, United Kingdom, 1978

“One snowy winter’s day, a boy builds a snowman who comes to life at the stroke of midnight. He and the boy play with appliances, toys and other bric-a-brac in the house, all while keeping quiet enough not to wake his parents. After they play with the lights on the family car, he prepares a feast that the duo eat by candlelight. The snowman takes the boy outside and they begin to fly over the South Downs and watch the sun coming up from Brighton pier before returning home.” – Wikipedia

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*The Snowy DayEzra Jack Keats  (**Audible)

~2, United States, 1962

“No book has captured the magic and sense of possibility of the first snowfall better than The Snowy Day. Universal in its appeal, the story has become a favorite of millions, as it reveals a child’s wonder at a new world, and the hope of capturing and keeping that wonder forever. The adventures of a little boy in the city on a very snowy day.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

The Story of Babar: the Little ElephantJean De Brunhoff (Audible)

~4, France, 1931

“It tells of a young elephant, named Babar, whose mother is killed by a hunter. Babar escapes, and in the process leaves the jungle, visits a big city, and returns to bring the benefits of civilization to his fellow elephants. Just as he returns to his community of elephants, their king dies from eating a bad mushroom. Because of his travels and civilization, Babar is appointed king of the elephant kingdom.” – Wikipedia
More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**The Story of FerdinandMunro Leaf (*Audible)

~3, United States, 1936

“Ferdinand is the world’s most peaceful–and–beloved little bull. While all of the other bulls snort, leap, and butt their heads, Ferdinand is content to just sit and smell the flowers under his favorite cork tree.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Strega NonaTomie dePaola (**Audible)

~4, United States, 1975

“When Strega Nona leaves him alone with her magic pasta pot, Big Anthony is determined to show the townspeople how it works in this classic Caldecott Honor book from Tomie dePaola. Strega Nona—”Grandma Witch”—is the source for potions, cures, magic, and comfort in her Calabrian town. Her magical everfull pasta pot is especially intriguing to hungry Big Anthony. He is supposed to look after her house and tend her garden but one day, when she goes over the mountain to visit Strega Amelia, Big Anthony recites the magic verse over the pasta pot, with disastrous results.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*Sylvester and the Magic PebbleWilliam Steig (**Audible)

3+, United States, 1969

“Sylvester can’t believe his luck when he finds a magic pebble that can make wishes come true. But when a lion jumps out at him on his way home, Sylvester is shocked into making a wish that has unexpected consequences. After overcoming a series of obstacles, Sylvester is eventually reunited with his loving family.” – Amazon
More information: Common Sense MediaWikipedia

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*The Tiger Who Came to TeaJudith Kerr (**Audible)

~4, United Kingdom, 1968

“The doorbell rings just as Sophie and her mummy are sitting down to tea. Who could it possibly be? What they certainly don’t expect to see at the door is a big furry, stripy tiger!” – GoodReads
More information: Wikipedia

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children and Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*TuesdayDavid Wiesner

~4, United States, 1991

“Now, with remarkable advances in the technology of color reproduction, the original artwork for Tuesday is being reproduced anew, for an edition even more faithful to the palette and texture of David Wiesner’s watercolor paintings. The whimsical account of a Tuesday when frogs were airborne on their lily pads will continue to enchant readers of all ages.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

*The Very Hungry CaterpillarEric Carle (*Audible)

~1, United States, 1969

“As the newborn caterpillar snacks through the pages (leaving behind a hole to stick a little finger through), he gets bigger, fatter, and turns into a lovely butterfly with wings the color of Swiss cheese, oranges, and cherry pie! Carle brings humor to the development of the caterpillar, one of the first science miracles a child learns.” – Common Sense Media

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books, Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

**We’re Going on a Bear HuntMichael Rosen

2+, United Kingdom, 1989

“Full of delightful comedy and high drama, this tale of a brave family’s joyous romp through sweeping landscapes is sure to win new fans.” – Amazon
More information: WikipediaGoodReads

Appearing in Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children and Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time

**Where the Wild Things AreMaurice Sendak (**Audible)

~4, United States, 1963

“Introduce a new generation to Max’s imaginative journey with this special anniversary edition. Let the wild rumpus continue as this classic comes to life like never before with new reproductions of Maurice Sendak’s artwork. Astonishing state-of-the-art technology faithfully captures the color and detail of the original illustrations. Sendak himself enthusiastically endorsed this impressive new interpretation of his art before his death in 2012. This iconic story has inspired a movie, an opera, and the imagination of generations.” – Amazon

More information: Common Sense Media

Appearing in Wikipedia’s Best-Selling Books, BBC’s 11 Greatest Children’s Books, Book Trust’s 100 Best Books for Children, New York Public Library’s 100 Great Children’s Books, Reader’s Digest’s 25 Best Children’s Books Ever Written, Time Magazine’s 100 Best Children’s Books of All Time, Reedsy Discovery’s 120 Best Children’s Books of All Time, and Common Sense Media’s 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They’re 12

Related Pages

  1. How to Raise a Reader
  2. How to Introduce a Book to a Learner
  3. The Most Noteworthy Books of All Time
  4. The Most Noteworthy Books of All Time (Chronologically)
  5. The Best Children’s Books
  6. Early Childhood Book List
  7. Late Childhood Book List
  8. Teenagers Book List